Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History
Department of Paleobiology
National Museum of Natural History
Smithsonian Institution
PALEO ART HOME
ILLUSTRATION CARE
Illustration Techniques
Illustration Care - page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
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Conservation advice and implementation of care
We consulted with Smithsonian paper conservators and archivists who suggested solutions that would work well for our needs, budget, and staff. Conservators then trained Paleobiology staff and volunteers to provide basic care for our paper-based materials. These methods were designed so that our regular staff, volunteers, and interns could work on the collection within a modest budget. Complex conservation treatment was always performed by professional paper conservators.

S. Pelot and F. Tsai caring for illustrations.

Conservation assistant, Sarah Pelot, (left) is placing art in a polyester film L-weld enclosure. Paper conservator, FeiWen Tsai (right) is stabilizing our illustration of a Diplodocus skull for exhibition.

We decided to rehouse our non-friable illustrations using polyester film L-weld enclosures with buffered, acid-free interleaving paper as inserts. The inserts absorbed any gasses emitted by the art that would otherwise be trapped in the polyester and further damage the art. The polyester allows the illustration to be handled and viewed while the art is still protected.

S. Stauderman caring for a drawing of Stegosaurus.   Smithsonian paper conservator, Sarah Stauderman, prepared custom-made portfolios out of acid-free corrugated blue board to house the oversize illustrations that were too large to fit in our standard metal cabinets. This skeletal reconstruction of Stegosaurus is the largest illustration in our collection. It is 183 cm - almost 6 feet wide.


PALEO ART HOME
ILLUSTRATION CARE
Illustration Techniques

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