Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Geologic Time The Story of a Changing Earth
Presented by the Department of Paleobiology.
The Mississippian
Contents
Overview
Life in the Seas
Tetrapods and Other Life on Land
Mississippian Tectonics and Climate
Evidence
Mississippian brachiopods
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Foundational Concepts
Dating Methods
Earth Processes
Life Processes
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Life in the Seas
Corals, mollusks, arthropods, and echinoderms (particularly crinoids) flourished in the warm, shallow seas. Fusulinid foraminiferans made their first appearance in the Mississippian. Brachiopods and bryozoans also thrived in these marine waters, and both groups were represented by many different families. Predatory ammonoids and other cephalopods were abundant, hunting many of these less mobile organisms. Trilobites were much less common than in previous time periods. Toward the end of the Mississippian, the continents uplifted to form more deltas and floodplains that supported gastropods, fresh-water arthropods, and fishes. Sharks were especially common, along with bony fishes such as acanthodians, lungfishes, coelacanths, and palaeoniscoids.

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Overview | Life in the Seas | Tetrapods and Other Life on Land
Mississippian Tectonics and Climate



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