Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Geologic Time The Story of a Changing Earth
Presented by the Department of Paleobiology.
The Paleocene
Contents
Epoch Overview
Terrestrial Life through the Paleocene
Life in the Paleocene Oceans
Climates and Shifting Continents
Evidence
Lower jaw of Plesiadapis cookei
learn more
sample
Shark's tooth
Ptilodus montanus
Ectocion ralstonensis
Caenolambda pattersoni
Creodont
Japanese scholar tree
Sycamore relative and dawn redwood
Insect damage on plant leaves
references and links
Foundational Concepts
Dating Methods
Earth Processes
Life Processes
Privacy Statement Copyright
Glossary Credits Email Us


Life in the Paleocene Oceans
The marine world of the Paleocene was much more like the modern marine realm than that of the Cretaceous. In particular, some of the largest and most common Mesozoic animals had vanished. Although many Cretaceous species of invertebrates and fishes survived the Cretaceous extinction event, among aquatic reptiles only turtles, crocodilians, and champsosaurs (a freshwater, crocodile-like fish eater) persisted into the Paleocene. Sharks are represented by mackerel sharks, several genera of sand tiger sharks, and the first small-toothed white shark. Bony fishes, especially teleosts, became more common as well. New forms of sea urchins and foraminiferans appeared, alongside more modern forms of gastropods and bivalves

=

Epoch Overview | Terrestrial Life through the Paleocene | Life in the Paleocene Oceans
Climates and Shifting Continents



Department of Paleobiology Home | National Museum of Natural History Home
Smithsonian Institution Home